Have you ever noticed that those who are loudest are almost always the ones who are wrong?  I love that point in any argument where the losing side gets mad and starts yelling.  I consider that a "pin" in the confrontation - that person has just been beaten, even if he or she doesn't know it or won't accept it yet. And what's true for private dialogue is also true for wider media coverage.  Have you ever lamented the fact that it seems like the screaming God-haters get more media attention than level-headed Christians with thoughtful and biblical answers for what they believe?  Where are the Christian voices?  Who is screaming back?

The reality of the situation is that we don't scream back.  Whatever motivates the pure vitriol of those who hate God (oh look at me pretending like I don't know what that is: Satan + a cold dead heart incapable of godly wisdom), the Christians are just not motivated in the same way.  We don't mind arguing for what we believe to be the truth, but the majority of us who call ourselves "Christian" (I can't include Fred Phelps here) aren't going to organize a hateful rally just to call the other side stupid.

And that bothers some of us.  We get tired of seeing the lies of the Enemy paraded around in public with no Truth stomping them down.  We see the incredibly foolish holes in the world's system of belief.  We see the gross inconsistencies.  We know the very truths that they need to understand in order to be free from deception, but the winning side is soft-spoken while the losers get very loud.

I saw this situation in Moses' life this morning while reading in the book of Numbers.  In chapter 12 of that book, Moses' brother, Aaron, and his sister, Miriam, get a little put-out with Moses' Cushite wife, Zipporah.  So they start complaining and saying, "Has the LORD indeed spoken only through Moses?  Has He not spoken through us also?" (Numbers 12:2).  Here comes the loud, public opposition towards the one who has been calmly and quietly right throughout the whole Exodus ordeal.

But the Bible tells us something very valuable about Moses at this point when it says, "Now the man Moses was very meek, more than all the people who were on the face of the earth" (Numbers 12:3).  This is valuable because it immediately reminds us of the one place in the Bible where the word "meek" sticks out like a sore thumb: Matthew 5:5, "Blessed are the meek, for they shall inherit the earth."  What does that word "meek" mean when it is applied to Moses?  It means that he was quietly and calmly right when his enemies got loud and obnoxious.  In fact, he was always on his face in prayer to God when the people railed against him.  And how did that work out for him?  Did it work out like Matthew 5:5?

As the scene plays out in the rest of Numbers 12, it is God Himself who defends the authority and honor of Moses over the people of Israel.  He claims Moses as His own special servant and bitterly rebukes the two siblings, even afflicting Miriam with seven days of leprosy for the outburst.  Moses does no screaming here; he throws no punches.  God fights for him.

This is a great encouragement to me, because though I believe that Christians ought to always have an answer for the hope that we have in Christ (1 Peter 3:15), we clearly are not called to fight the enemies of the Truth with the same feverish hatred that they show for us.  We can be calmly confident of the truth of the revelation that God has given us in the Scriptures, and after sufficiently defending such truths, we can rest our case and let God take care of the rebuke towards those who get loud in their error.  And we can be confident that we will win.  We will inherit the earth.  The Truth of God will triumph through those who hold firmly to it in the face of all the Devil's fury.